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19
Jan
0

Antiinflammatory Action of Glucocorticoids — New Mechanisms for Old Drugs

Posted by on in Skin Matters

Alert 19 icon

Steroids have adverse effects: growth retardation in children, immunosuppression, hypertension, inhibition of wound repair, osteoporosis, and metabolic disturbances. All these harmful properties contraindicate prolonged glucocorticoid therapy.

 

 

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30
Oct
0

Cordyceps an immunosuppressive drug

Posted by on in Skin Matters

Alert 18 icon

Immunosuppressive drugs are applied to control autoimmune disorders and inflammation when excessive tissue damage occurs, as well as to prevent transplant rejection after an organ transplant. Increasing evidence shows that cordyceps is a bidirectional modulator with both potentiating and suppressive effects on the immune system through regulating innate and adaptive immunity. 

 

 

Reference:

Feng K, Yang Y. Q, Li S. P. Renggongchongcao. In: Li S. P, Wang Y. T, editors. Pharmacological Activity-Based Quality Control of Chinese Herbs. New York: Nova Science Publisher, Inc.; 2008. pp. 155–78.

Li S. P, Tsim K. W. The biological and pharmacological properties of Cordyceps sinensis, a traditional Chinese medicine that has broad clinical applications. In: Herbal and Traditional Medicine. New York: Marcel Dekker; 2004. pp. 657–82.

Ng T. B, Wang H. X. Pharmacological actions of Cordyceps, a prized folk medicine. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2005;57:1509–19.

Zhou X, Gong Z, Su Y, Lin J, Tang K. Cordyceps fungi: Natural products, pharmacological functions and developmental products. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2009a;61:279–91.

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31
Jul
0

Adverse Reactions to Topical Steroids

Posted by on in Skin Matters

Alert 16 iconRosacea, perioral dermatitis, acne; Skin atrophy with telangiectasia, stellate pseudo scars(arms), purpura, striae (from anatomic occlusion, e.g., groin); Tinea incognito, impetigo incognito, scabies incognito; Ocular hypertension, glaucoma, cataracts; Allergic contact dermatitis; Systemic absorption; Burning, itching, irritation, dryness caused by vehicle(e.g., propylene glycol); Miliaria and folliculitus following occlusion with plastic dressing; Skin blanching from acute vasoconstriction; Rebound phenomenon (e.g., psoriasis becomes worse after treatment is stopped); Nonhealing leg ulcers; steroids applied to any leg ulcerated healing process; Hypopigmentation; Hypertrichosis of face.

 

Reference:

Thomas P. Habif: Clinical Dermatology,A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy, 6th Edition.
2016. Elsevier. Page82-89

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31
May
0

A systematic review of topical corticosteroid withdrawal (steroid addiction) in patients with atopic dermatitis and other dermatoses

Posted by on in Skin Matters

Alert 16 iconSteroids withdrawal (addiction) syndrome is a distinct clinical adverse effect of steroid misuse (Hagar T, Leshem YA, Hannifin JM, etc. 2015). Patients and physicians should be aware of its clinical features and risk factors to identify and prevent this complication. 76.7% of patients with steroid withdrawal syndrome received complete or partial clearance in 3 months, 12.5% in 6 months, 5.5% in 12 months and 5.1% over 12 months respectively after discontinuation use of steroid.

 

 

 

Reference:

Hagar T, Leshem YA, Hannifin JM, etc. (2015) Asystematic review of topical corticosteroid withdraw (steroid addiction) in patients with atopic dermatitis and other dermatoses. J Am Acad Dermatol 2015;72:541-549

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29
May
0

Evaluating the economic burden of psoriasis in the United States

Posted by on in Skin Matters

Alert_15_iconThe prevalence of psoriasis in the US was estimated to be 7.4 million in 2013. Comparatively,psoriasis patients incurred incremental medical costs of $2284, experienced a $2203 reduction in HRQOL, and a $1935 reduction in productivity. The total burden of psoriasis was estimated as $35.2 billion, with $12.2 billion in incremental medical costs (35%), $11.8 billion from reduced HRQOL (34%), and $11.2 billion from productivity losses (32%).

 

 

 

Reference:

Jacqueline Vanderpuye-Orgle, Yang Zhao, Jackie Lu, etc. (2015) Evaluating the economic burden of psoriasis in the United States. J Am Acad Dermatol 2015;71:961-967

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